Imagine if you didn’t have to try..

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Imagine being unapologetically YOU.

Imagine expressing yourself the way you choose to

Imagine a life where the noise of society falls away like a drop in the ocean

Cavalierly walking the streets, barefeet

Imagine.

 

Imagine not having to prove yourself to be better than..

faster than…

prettier than..

smarter than…

A life without comparison, just imagine

 

Imagine being taught this song as a child, have it melodically impressed in your mind

Imagine the freedom and power bolting through your veins every single day

Stress free, worry free, make up free… HAPPY

One can only imagine

 

Imagine being influenced by what or who is in you..

Not having to try anything to make others like or accept you

Imagine being your own leader, creating your own norms

No jurisdiction, no laws, no chains, no saws

 

Stop imagining.

Be.

Miss Eastern Cape- a pageant with a purpose

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I recently had the experience of being on a panel of what I thought was a beauty pageant. At the time of accepting the invitation, I had several reservations. Based on what I write about and who I am, you would know that I never want to be in a position of power that “judges” people according to their looks and legs and not who they are. That’s not who I am (anymore).The All-Girls’ school paradigm and standard of mainstream beauty has long evaded me and helping ladies feel secure in themselves is who I have chosen to be. I also advocate against the objectification of women which exploits their souls by the instrumentality of their bodies.

I walked into the venue filled with giggling girls in their high heels. Some looked eager, some nervous and others inert.

I spotted the organizer and brains behind the initiative, Zikhona Ngxata, who looked like one of the girls herself. Zikhona was a pageant queen and still holds the title and passion in her heart, which is why she brought this competition to life.

Of course, I snowballed her with questions about the pageant before sitting on the judging seat, just to ease my conscience.

Firstly I learnt that the pageant has two categories, Miss Eastern Cape (Ages 20-30) and Miss Eastern Cape Teen (ages 13-19). Secondly, the beauty pageant is focused on developing and empowering young girls and young women from the Eastern Cape.

Having looked at the social ills in our province, Zikhona’s team together with the Departments of Health and Education, found that the Eastern Cape is one of the provinces that is mostly affected by teenage pregnancy, substance abuse, poverty and illiteracy. Zikhona’s company came up with this campaign that tries to deter these young girls and young women away from the streets and instill value and principles of self-love and self-value.  Lastly, Miss Eastern Cape looks to develop these young ladies from a holistic approach; spiritually, politically, economically and socially.

Miss Eastern Cape (incl Teen) will instill values of gratitude,with the knowledge of the blood shed for our freedom. The onus  is on us to sustain and maintain this honour instead of abusing it. Furthermore, the women will work together with their chosen communities to build an even brighter and better future for our lovely, province and country.

Eastern Cape is the ‘home of legends’ and if we do not step up to the plate as young people, that statement will remain a part of history.

Women have  power to influence and need to be cognizant of it and activate it. This collective  influence will raise an army that will go together in fighting the social ills and making the province a better place to live in.

I believe this is the start of great things for the Eastern Cape and South Africa at large. The message behind this concept “beauty with purpose” completely overturns the external trajectory of outer beauty and focuses on the inner, truest beauty, compassion and social responsibility.

Needless to say, I was happy to be part of the Port Elizabeth panel and a keen supporter of this cause. Women, thou art loosed!

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*Miss Eastern Cape will be held at the East London International Convention Centre on 6 December 2014. Miss Eastern Cape and Miss Eastern Cape Teen  tickets are R 120.00 normal seats and R250.00 for VIP, (VIP includes a 3 course cocktail meal) and are available at Computicket!

15 things you should do at least once in your life

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The sky isn’t the limit, it’s my office!

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We are often told that the sky is the limit. Oyama Matomela, a commercial pilot license holder at 22, South African brand ambassador and strong believer in our living God disputes this, saying it’s more like her office. She is a loving, fun person, with a whole lot of spunk. She believes that laughing is one of the best things on earth and describes herself as sassy, driven, goal-orientated and ambitious beyond her abilities (sometimes). She is added to the ever-growing list of Sorority Sayings contributors, and this is what she had to say!

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SS: When did you realize that you wanted to be a pilot?

OM: Early memories of family trips taken to the Port Elizabeth International Airport to watch in fascination while the aircrafts take-off and land, brought to me an unimaginable dire need to venture into Aviation and Piloting in my teen years

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SS:When did you qualify?

OM: The Department of Roads and Transport of The Eastern Cape awarded me a bursary to commence my initial pilot training (theoretical and practical) at 43 Air School, Port Alfred in January of 2010. A life-changing year and eight months was spent in what was the most challenging and seemingly impossible experience that without a doubt tested my passion for flying. This tested me, drove me to work harder than I ever thought I could. There was no limit I would not stretch to, to achieve my goal of becoming a multi-engine, instrument rated commercial pilot in August of 2011.

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SS: What where the biggest obstacles to obtaining your wings?

OM: It became difficult for a low hour pilot such as myself, to find a job in this ever growing Aviation Industry. In December 2012, I self-studied gearing myself to write the Airline Transport Pilot License Examinations in March 2012 which I did and successfully passed all of them.I then enrolled for the September 2012 Grade III Flight Instructor Rating course (fixed wing) with the aid of The Department of Roads and Transport of The Eastern Cape, which I successfully completed and became a qualified Grade III Flight Instructor in December 2012.

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SS: Please share some of the struggles that women face in this industry.

OM: As females we are, for the most part, raised in a different light. Playing with dolls in princess castles rather than being exposed to machinery, while men are generally exposed to racing cars as young boys, this raises the stereotype that compared to men, females do not have the natural ability to fly. As a female pilot in a male dominated industry, you take these stereotypes in your stride and pray more often, work harder, practice discipline and sacrifice your all. With passion, half the battle is won.

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SS: You recently won an award, what was it and how were you selected?

OM: I was recently nominated for CEO Communications’ “Most Influential Women in Business and Governance”. I was notified by CEO Communications that I had been nominated. I then had to fill in an extensive questionnaire of my qualifications and role to society in the Aviation Sector. A selection process narrowed the nine thousand nominations and entries to just under one hundred. It was an incredible honour to be nominated for this role and an overwhelming surprise to receive a finalist award in the Aviation Sector.

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SS: How do young girls, who look up to you, join the industry?

OM: I would definitely encourage young women and girls to pursue a career in the Aviation industry. Young girls should start off on the right foot at school in concentrating on Mathematics and Science. These are two subjects that sponsorships and bursary benefactors base their selection processes on.

Mostly,as women we shouldn’t limit our dreams. Nothing is impossible, even the word says “I’M POSSIBLE”.

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Happy Birthday Captain Ojams! We celebrate you! Keep rocking the runway!

#Womandla

The one flaw in EVERY woman

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“Women have strengths that amaze men.

They bear hardships and they carry burdens,

but they hold happiness, love and joy.

They smile when they want to scream.

They sing when they want to cry.

They cry when they are happy

and laugh when they are nervous.

They fight for what they believe in…

They stand up to injustice.

They don’t take “no” for an answer

when they believe there is a better solution.

They go without so their family can have.

They go to the doctor with a frightened friend.

They love unconditionally.

They cry when their children excel

and cheer when their friends get awards.

They are happy when they hear about

a birth or a wedding…

Their hearts break when a friend dies.

They grieve at the loss of a family member,

yet they are strong when they

think there is no strength left…

They know that a hug and a kiss

can heal a broken heart.

Women come in all shapes, sizes and colours.

They’ll drive, fly, walk, run or e-mail you

to show how much they care about you.

The heart of a woman is what

makes the world keep turning.

They bring joy, hope and love.

They have compassion and ideas.

They give moral support to their

family and friends.

Women have vital things to say

and everything to give..

However, if there is one flaw in women,

IT IS THAT THEY FORGET THEIR WORTH.”