15 things you should do at least once in your life

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The sky isn’t the limit, it’s my office!

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We are often told that the sky is the limit. Oyama Matomela, a commercial pilot license holder at 22, South African brand ambassador and strong believer in our living God disputes this, saying it’s more like her office. She is a loving, fun person, with a whole lot of spunk. She believes that laughing is one of the best things on earth and describes herself as sassy, driven, goal-orientated and ambitious beyond her abilities (sometimes). She is added to the ever-growing list of Sorority Sayings contributors, and this is what she had to say!

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SS: When did you realize that you wanted to be a pilot?

OM: Early memories of family trips taken to the Port Elizabeth International Airport to watch in fascination while the aircrafts take-off and land, brought to me an unimaginable dire need to venture into Aviation and Piloting in my teen years

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SS:When did you qualify?

OM: The Department of Roads and Transport of The Eastern Cape awarded me a bursary to commence my initial pilot training (theoretical and practical) at 43 Air School, Port Alfred in January of 2010. A life-changing year and eight months was spent in what was the most challenging and seemingly impossible experience that without a doubt tested my passion for flying. This tested me, drove me to work harder than I ever thought I could. There was no limit I would not stretch to, to achieve my goal of becoming a multi-engine, instrument rated commercial pilot in August of 2011.

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SS: What where the biggest obstacles to obtaining your wings?

OM: It became difficult for a low hour pilot such as myself, to find a job in this ever growing Aviation Industry. In December 2012, I self-studied gearing myself to write the Airline Transport Pilot License Examinations in March 2012 which I did and successfully passed all of them.I then enrolled for the September 2012 Grade III Flight Instructor Rating course (fixed wing) with the aid of The Department of Roads and Transport of The Eastern Cape, which I successfully completed and became a qualified Grade III Flight Instructor in December 2012.

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SS: Please share some of the struggles that women face in this industry.

OM: As females we are, for the most part, raised in a different light. Playing with dolls in princess castles rather than being exposed to machinery, while men are generally exposed to racing cars as young boys, this raises the stereotype that compared to men, females do not have the natural ability to fly. As a female pilot in a male dominated industry, you take these stereotypes in your stride and pray more often, work harder, practice discipline and sacrifice your all. With passion, half the battle is won.

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SS: You recently won an award, what was it and how were you selected?

OM: I was recently nominated for CEO Communications’ “Most Influential Women in Business and Governance”. I was notified by CEO Communications that I had been nominated. I then had to fill in an extensive questionnaire of my qualifications and role to society in the Aviation Sector. A selection process narrowed the nine thousand nominations and entries to just under one hundred. It was an incredible honour to be nominated for this role and an overwhelming surprise to receive a finalist award in the Aviation Sector.

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SS: How do young girls, who look up to you, join the industry?

OM: I would definitely encourage young women and girls to pursue a career in the Aviation industry. Young girls should start off on the right foot at school in concentrating on Mathematics and Science. These are two subjects that sponsorships and bursary benefactors base their selection processes on.

Mostly,as women we shouldn’t limit our dreams. Nothing is impossible, even the word says “I’M POSSIBLE”.

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Happy Birthday Captain Ojams! We celebrate you! Keep rocking the runway!

#Womandla

The one flaw in EVERY woman

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“Women have strengths that amaze men.

They bear hardships and they carry burdens,

but they hold happiness, love and joy.

They smile when they want to scream.

They sing when they want to cry.

They cry when they are happy

and laugh when they are nervous.

They fight for what they believe in…

They stand up to injustice.

They don’t take “no” for an answer

when they believe there is a better solution.

They go without so their family can have.

They go to the doctor with a frightened friend.

They love unconditionally.

They cry when their children excel

and cheer when their friends get awards.

They are happy when they hear about

a birth or a wedding…

Their hearts break when a friend dies.

They grieve at the loss of a family member,

yet they are strong when they

think there is no strength left…

They know that a hug and a kiss

can heal a broken heart.

Women come in all shapes, sizes and colours.

They’ll drive, fly, walk, run or e-mail you

to show how much they care about you.

The heart of a woman is what

makes the world keep turning.

They bring joy, hope and love.

They have compassion and ideas.

They give moral support to their

family and friends.

Women have vital things to say

and everything to give..

However, if there is one flaw in women,

IT IS THAT THEY FORGET THEIR WORTH.”

Presidential Girl- Bonolo Cebe

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This week’s contributor to the online sorority is Bonolo Cebe. She is no stranger to South African youth developers and social entrepreneurs. Bonolo,22, was the youngest Fellow in South Africa to be selected for the Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI) Fellowship Summit 2014. She’s an extraordinary African woman who sees beauty in everything. Her work, passion and cause is to empower the African girl child to dream beyond what her circumstances allow. She is an innovator, speak-lifer and creative soul that is operating under the assumption that everything is possible. I asked her a couple of  questions about her experiences in America, being in the White House and Women in Leadership.

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SS: What was your motivation behind entering the YALI Fellowship Summit?

BC: The Young African Leaders Initiative for me, presented a unique opportunity to develop and hone my leaderships skills as a young woman on the continent and also meet some of the most incredible young leaders who are working to write a new history for Africa through the tangible contributions they are making. Going into it my aim was to learn as much as possible from these powerful young people and collaborate in addressing some of the challenges that exist.

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SS: What  thoughts were going through your mind when you realized that you were selected for the programme?

BC: I was excited, but I knew that it was not by my might and that the glory belongs to God alone. More than anything, I was overcome by a deep gratitude because for the journey.

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SS: What was the first picture you took in America? Show us!

BC:The first (good) picture I took was at the Fayetteville Market

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SS: Besides gifts, what have you brought home with you?
Three key things: A renewed sense of purpose; Strategies for greater impact; A wider network and new friendships

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SS: Any challenges faced on your stay?
BC: The ignorance of some Americans pertaining to issues outside of America. The ignorance is real and it became rather challenging to engage with some people.

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SS. How did you overcome those challenges?

BC: Sometimes, to overcome ignorance one needs to get informed. I found myself having to invite people to have conversations that stretched and challenged their perceptions towards Africa.

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SS: Did you feel there was a strong presence of Women in Leadership in the White House, or just generally?

BC: There is a presence of women in the White House however the nature of politics is still patriarchal. Also there is still a low percentage of women running for office in America. Although there has been some progress, the top jobs in the white house are still occupied by men. One of the sessions we had during the course was on women in public office and one of the key challenges that came up is the fact that the remuneration gap is still quite big between male and females working in the same jobs.

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SS: What is the most important thing you’ll teach women of Africa, after your trip?
BC: Dear African woman: Tell your story, tell it well so that it may empower others. Leave a trail, we all got to where we are because someone showed us how they paved their own journey. Share, so that other generations may walk in greatness.

Believe.

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Thank you Bonzolezza Rice! Greater things are yet to come! Keep the light shining and the fire burning!

Proud to be doing things #LikeAGirl

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“Using #LikeAGirl as an insult is a hard knock against any adolescent girl. And since the rest of puberty’s really no picnic either, it’s easy to see what a huge impact it can have on a girl’s self-confidence.
Always kicked off an epic battle to make sure that girls everywhere keep their confidence throughout puberty and beyond, and making a start by showing them that doing it #LikeAGirl is an awesome thing.”

I was really moved by this video, which is similar to the Dove one that I have published before. Campaign managers and advertising teams are bringing back the real,emotive, ambient marketing to generate sales. This isn’t a bad thing. What is always important in PR campaigns is making a mental imprint and driving the message home.

There is an obvious bias to my liking of this video because I am a woman, and after seeing it, I’m even more proud. I am in full support of changing perceptions and instilling a sense of worth into young women and men,actually. This is one thing we as young ladies can all relate to, watch and feel empowered afterwards.
What do YOU do #LikeAGirl?

Molo Molo Simply Sybz

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“Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.” -Albert Einstein
Dr Sibongiseni Tunzelana alluded to this on her recent visit to Port Elizabeth, but not in so many words.

The School of ICT hosted the affluent Information Systems guru at it’s first Women in IT celebratory breakfast this past week. The vibrant speaker holds many titles such as dj, business analyst, business owner,sound engineer, mentor just to name a few. She suggested to be called “Simply Sybz” as if all those roles are effortlessly juggled. The irony!

As she was sharing her life story, it made me even more open to the world and goaded new thoughts of infinite possibility. What amazed me is how she juggles so many things, yet still remains humble and centered.

Her attention to detail and quality of excellence is what sets her apart from most speakers who happen to say cliche airy fairy things. The overly used “dream big” expression came to life and became so real and tangible as I heard her speak. She demonstrated  how a young girl like her, from the rural areas of the Eastern Cape, could be well traveled and basically have conquered the world.

I won’t lie, her techno-geek jargon, coding and programming gripes are the few things that flew over my head. Everyone in the room seemed to understand though what the usual IT struggles are. The lesson in it all though was to keep developing oneself and continue having a hunger to learn. Knowing that your best, might not be the best and in order to have a competitive advantage, one must be willing to work for it. Once you hit the number one small spot, opportunities find you rather than the other way around.

It seems I still have a loads of work to do. Truthfully, the work never stops.

“You cannot measure 1,3m and want to be a supermodel.”  was one of her favorite pull quotes.(To draw the parallel between what she kept saying and Albert Einstein.) You would be defeating yourself. The talk ended with a wonderful single of hers due out for release featuring PE’s Ifani and her cousin, Nathi. The  bouncy African infused track is called Molo Molo (Hello, hello in isiXhosa).

I’m glad she was so willing and enthused to visit the Bay. Simply Sybz is that exception of you can do it all, and live life on your own terms and doing everything you love. All is possible only if you continue to go back to the middle, and get centered. She spoke to every demographic and left us all motivated and energized.

The onus is now on me to dig up my vision board out and stick to what she said, “Your biggest success is in your heart”. Good gracious, I might have to dig up my heart too.. JOKES.

There is nothing orthodox about the way she does things, this might just be the recipe to her success. Chesa!smiling sibongiseni - professional pic